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2007 BBC2 Folk Awards Recap
2/10/2007 (updated 2/10/2007)



WINNERS 2007

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD – DANNY THOMPSON

In his 40-plus years as a professional musician, acoustic bass player Danny Thompson has worked with the cream of the music industry, from Roy Orbison and Rod Stewart to Pentangle, Richard Thompson and John Martyn. Widely regarded as a genius by musicians and fans alike, his improvisatory style is utterly distinctive and ‘Victoria’, his beloved bass, has accompanied him on dozens of albums including four solo recordings.



Peter Gabriel presents Danny Thompson with his Lifetime Achievement Award



Double-bass supremo Danny Thompson with his Lifetime Achievement Award

OUTSTANDINGS CONTRIBUTION - PENTANGLE

The BBC Folk Awards annually makes special presentations for outstanding contributions to folk music and this year Danny Thompson provided a common link in both Lifetime Achievement Awards. The double bass ace received one of the awards from Genesis founder and world music promoter Peter Gabriel who, along with countless A-list musicians, has gladly “entrusted his bottom end” to Danny over his 50-year professional career. The second award went to folk legends Pentangle, whose original line-up of Jacqui McShee, Bert Jansch, John Renbourn, Danny Thompson and Terry Cox had reconvened especially for this occasion. Presenter Sir David Attenborough received a standing ovation and spoke in his trademark impassioned way about folk music and his early broadcasting days at Alexander Palace when he knew Ewan MacColl, Bert Lloyd,
Shirley Collins and other folk pioneers.

AUDIENCE VOTE – FAVOURITE FOLK TRACK –
WHO KNOWS WHERE THE TIME GOES: SANDY DENNY/FAIRPORT CONVENTION




Fairport Convention’s Simon Nicol accepting the trophy for Favourite Folk Track Of All Time
on behalf of the late Sandy Denny

Although only with the band for 18 months, Sandy Denny remains for many the abiding voice of Fairport Convention. Who Knows Where The Time Goes was her second composition, written in 1967. She first recorded it during a brief stint with The Strawbs in 1968 and Judy Collins popularised the song later that year, but it’s Sandy’s own recording with Fairport, underpinned by
Richard Thompson’s glorious guitar, which remains the definitive version.

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